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  • Charles C. Ragin
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  1. “5 Qualitative Comparative Analysis using Fuzzy Sets (fsQCA)”

    Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    After reading this chapter, you should be able to: Understand key differences between crisp set and fuzzy set logics Calibrate in an informed way the fuzzy-set membership scores for the different conditions See the connection between the multidimension...

    Methods: Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) , Comparative research , Comparison , Fuzzy logic

  2. The SAGE Handbook of Case-Based Methods

    The SAGE Handbook of Case-Based Methods

    David Byrne & Charles C. Ragin

    (2009)

    ‘This book provides a fresh and stimulating approach to causal analysis in the social sciences. International experts provide not just the philosophical arguments for a case-based approach to research but also detailed chapters on: ‘why-to’, ‘when-to’ and ‘how-to’. Traditional distinc...

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781446249413

    Methods: Generalisability , Case study , Cases , Generalisation

  3. Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    Benoît Rihoux & Charles C. Ragin

    (2009)

    Paves the way for an innovative approach to empirical scientific work through a strategy that integrates key strengths of both qualitative ...

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781452226569

    Methods: Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) , Comparative research , Comparison

  4. “1 Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) as an Approach”

    Dirk Berg-Schlosser, Gisèle De Meur, Benoît Rihoux & Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    After reading this chapter, you should be able to: Locate QCA as an approach and grasp its key epistemological foundations Understand how and why QCA is “case oriented” and how one should use QCA to engage in a dialogue between cases and theories Under...

    Methods: Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) , Comparative research , Comparison

  5. “3 Crisp-Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (csQCA)”

    Benoît Rihoux & Gisèle De Meur

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    After reading this chapter, you should be able to: Understand the key operations of Boolean algebra and use the correct conventions of that language Transform tabular data into Venn diagrams and vice versa; interpret Venn diagrams Replicate a standard ...

    Methods: Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) , Comparative research , Comparison , Boolean logic

  6. “4 Multi-Value QCA (mvQCA)”

    Lasse Cronqvist & Dirk Berg-Schlosser

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    After reading this chapter, you should be able to do the following: Reflect on the limitations of using dichotomized conditions and on the potential advantages of using multi-value conditions Read and use the specific mvQCA notation; grasp the basics of mu...

    Methods: Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) , Computer-assisted qualitative data analysis (CAQDAS) , Comparative research , Comparison

  7. “6 A Commented Review of Applications”

    Sakura Yamasaki & Benoît Rihoux

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    After reading this chapter, you should: Understand how key steps of QCA techniques have been dealt with, and concrete difficulties solved, in some selected “real life” applications. Have a more precise view of both “good practices” and inventive ways of us...

    Methods: Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) , Comparative research , Comparison , Fuzzy logic

  8. “2 Comparative Research Design: Case and Variable Selection”

    Dirk Berg-Schlosser & Gisèle De Meur

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    After reading this chapter, you should be able to: Clearly delimit the universe of investigation within which you select your cases, with a key preoccupation in the definition of the outcome of interest Choose the type of research design that is most s...

    Methods: Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) , Research design , Comparative research , Comparison

  9. “7 Addressing the Critiques of QCA”

    Gisèle De Meur, Benoît Rihoux & Sakura Yamasaki

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    After reading this chapter, you should be able to: Draw a distinction between relevant and less relevant critiques voiced vis-à-vis QCA techniques Have a clearer view of the respective strengths and limitations of csQCA, mvQCA, and fsQCA Distinguish cr...

    Methods: Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) , Comparative research , Comparison

  10. “Comparative Methods”

    Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: The SAGE Handbook of Social Science Methodology

    (2007)

    Unfortunately, it is still common to present comparative methodology as an inferior version of conventional variable-oriented analysis (e.g., King et al., 1994). The goals of comparative analysis are assumed to be the same as those of variable-oriented analysis: to a...

    Methods: Historical research , Theory , Comparative research , Experiments , Correlation

  11. “Introduction”

    Benoît Rihoux & Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    Comparison lies at the heart of human reasoning and is always there in the observation of the world—“thinking without comparison is unthinkable” (Swanson, 1971, p. 45). Indeed, even the observation of singular phenomena is empty if we do not engage in a comparison: A...
  12. “Acknowledgements”

    David Byrne & Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: The SAGE Handbook of Case-Based Methods

    (2009)

    All intellectual projects are the resultant of the work of lots of individuals and indeed often of many institutions. That is particularly true of a collective effort like this Handbook. Many people have helped us in many ways. Some of them are contributors here, some are n...
  13. “Part One: The Methodological Context of Case-Based Methods”

    David Byrne & Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: The SAGE Handbook of Case-Based Methods

    (2009)

    This Part of the book comprises five papers that locate case-based methods in their methodological context. The first, by David Harvey, sets case-based approaches in relation to the methodological programme of the history of social science in general, but sociology in parti...
  14. “Typologies–Ways of Sorting Things Out”

    David Byrne & Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: The SAGE Handbook of Case-Based Methods

    (2009)

    Classifications ...
  15. “Appendix: Further Resources for Configurational Comparative Methods”

    Benoît Rihoux & Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    There are two key locations where you will find further information and a large amount of resources on Configurational Comparative Methods. The first one, specifically as a companion to this textbook, ...
  16. “Glossary”

    Benoît Rihoux & Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    It is crucial to use the correct QCA terminology when writing up a report, publication, and so on in order to: Avoid confusing the reader, especially if he or she has been mostly trained in different methods and approaches Reinforce the notion that QCA tec...
  17. “About the Editors”

    Benoît Rihoux & Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    The editors and contributors of this textbook are all active in the COMPASSS research group ( ). Benoît Rihoux is professor of political science at the Centre de Politique Comparùe of the Université catholique de Louvain (Belgium). His substantive research interest...
  18. “List of Boxes, Figures, and Tables”

    Benoît Rihoux & Charles C. Ragin

    Found in: Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

    (2009)

    Boxes Box 0.1 About Terminology and Labels: QCA, csQCA, mvQCA, fsQCA, and Software xix Box 0.2 Goals of This Textbook xx Box 0.3 Pedagogical Resources in This Textbook xxiii Box 1.1 “Multiple Conjunctural Causation” in a Nutshell 8 ...
Showing 1-20 of 777 items

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