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Book

Ethnographic Approaches to Researching Crime and Deviance

Introduction 90 What is ethnography? 91 The origins of ethnography 93 The Chicago School and its legacy 94 A new twist: the Deviancy School and ethnography in the UK 95 Feminist criminologies and ethnography 96 The decline of ethnography? 98 Contemporary ethnographies of crime and criminals 99 Contemporary ethnographies of criminal justice agencies and institutions 101 Concluding comments 103 Within criminology the ethnographic tradition is long established. Indeed some researchers have gone so far as suggesting that ethnography has been especially reliant on studies of deviance (Adler and Adler, 1995; Lofland, 1987; Manning, 1987), leading to studies of youth subcultures, gangs, prostitution, professional and organized crime and illicit drug use (see Hobbs, 2001 for an overview). This is a contentious view but it can be argued that some of the most important contributions to the sociology of crime and deviance have developed out of ethnographic work. Coupled with the use ...

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