Share Share
Text size Increase font size Decrease font size
Share Share
Text size Increase font size Decrease font size

Dictionary

Longitudinal research

ELISABETTA RUSPINI

‘Longitudinal’ is a broad term. It can be defined as research in which: (1) data are collected for two or more distinct periods (implying the notion of repeated measurements);(2) the subjects or cases analysed are the same, or at least comparable, from one period to the next; and (3) the analysis involves some comparison of data between or among periods (Menard, 1991: 4). There are a number of different designs for the construction of longitudinal evidence: repeated cross-sectional studies; prospective studies, such as household panel surveys or cohort panels; and retrospective studies, such as life and work histories and oral histories. In the social sciences, cross-sectional observations are the form of data most commonly used for assessing the determinants of behaviour (Davies, 1994; Blossfeld and Rohwer, 1995). However, the cross-sectional survey, because it is conducted at just one point in time, is not suited for the study of social change. ...

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content on this page. Please, subscribe or login to access all Methods content.

Click here to see full text

Articles in Google Scholar by